Through discussion this week in both the UDL and Legal Strategies classes,  the concepts of cooperation, collaboration, perseverance, and responsibility came up.  While perusing the Internet for information on collaborative learning, I came upon a reference to a book that I plan to purchase — Designing & Teaching Learning Goals & Objectives by Robert J Marzano. In his book, Marzano introduces for me an intriguing concept – non-cognitive learning goals.

We are so focused in our educational systems on GPAs as predictors of college and life success, but what about those other critical factors that must be in place to successfully manage school, college, work and life environments? Marzano discusses those factors such as study skills, work habits, time management, and help-seeking behaviors. Other educational experts and researchers are also increasingly pointing to the importance of non-cognitive learning concepts that support the idea that students fall short on their intellectual potential because of their failure to exhibit collaborative and non-cognitive learning goals. At this link, http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/noncognitive%20report.pdf , I found a great report that talks about the 5 critical categories of non-learning:
1) academic behaviors (doing homework, going to class)
2) academic perseverance (self-discipline, tenacity)
3) academic mindset (“I can succeed,” “I belong”)
4) learning strategies (goal setting, study skills)
5) social skills (interpersonal relationships, responsibility, cooperation)

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One response »

  1. wchalmers says:

    There’s much to be said about how the skills that our students need to be successful in life are far different than the content of tests. Being able to take a standardized test (assessment) or read a book (while reading is very important) will not ensure a career or a productive way of life. Being able to work with others, problem solve, communicate effectively, use a calculator, write a check, pay a bill, locate information, accept constructive criticism, navigate the community independently…these are the skills that will ensure success.

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